Techno Blender
Digitally Yours.

Business Disruptions Wane as Some Industries See a Return to Normal

0 21


After more than two years of pandemic-related upheaval, businesses in many corners of the economy are seeing their Covid disruptions recede.

Supply-chain disruptions have eased. A lack of semiconductors has flipped to a glut, marking a sharp turnaround from a global shortage during two years of supercharged demand. And small businesses and restaurants are finding it easier to hire workers, although pizza-delivery drivers are in short supply after being busy during the pandemic.

With the new year approaching, here is a look at some of The Wall Street Journal’s recent coverage about businesses normalizing following the Covid disruption.

Lengthy backlogs of cargo ships at large ports are gone and ocean shipping rates have fallen below prepandemic levels.



Photo:

David Walter Banks for The Wall Street Journal

Supply-Chain Congestion Eases

Goods are moving around the world again and reaching companies and consumers, despite some production bottlenecks and Covid outbreaks inside China. Weekslong backlogs of cargo ships at large ports from earlier in the pandemic are gone. Ocean shipping rates have fallen below prepandemic levels.

Chips Flip the Script

Chip inventories are swelling, mirroring what is happening in the wider economy where retailers are stuck with goods on their shelves and producers of a range of products in high demand early in the pandemic now face a glut.

The global semiconductor industry has flipped from a shortage to a glut.



Photo:

Heather Ainsworth for The Wall Street Journal

Last-Minute Holiday Shopping Returns

Discounts returned as stores tried to entice cost-conscious customers who were willing to wait for the best deals. The holiday season nail-biter for retailers is a reversal from the past two years, when supply-chain backlogs and shipping delays created an urgency among consumers to shop earlier.

Shoppers are again waiting longer for the best holiday deals as retailers tried to lure them back to stores with discounts.



Photo:

Sinna Nasseri for The Wall Street Journal

Workers Return to Restaurant Jobs

The restaurant industry, which experienced some of the biggest reductions in jobs and workers after the pandemic struck the U.S., has erased most of those losses. Restaurants and bars added 62,000 jobs in November, according to the Labor Department. Restaurant owners and workers attribute the return to a combination of factors including pay increases, improving working conditions and fewer opportunities elsewhere.

Small Businesses Find Hiring Relief

Unfilled job openings continue to weigh on many small businesses. But December marked the first time since July where more small-business owners said in a survey for the Journal that they found it easier—rather than harder—to find workers. Some entrepreneurs say steps such as raising pay, adding apprenticeship programs and rewriting job ads are starting to pay off. Others report an increase in applicants as competitors pull back on hiring or begin layoffs.

Growth is cooling for food-delivery apps such as Uber Eats and DoorDash.



Photo:

Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet for The Wall Street Journal

Food-Delivery Habits Shift

After taking off during the Covid-19 crisis, the biggest food-delivery apps,

DoorDash

and Uber Eats, have continued to record sales expansion. But growth has cooled across the industry. People are switching to in-store pickups, ordering fewer dishes and changing what they get delivered, analysts and industry executives said.

Pizzerias Work to Recruit Delivery Drivers

A shortage of delivery drivers is hurting pizzeria owners ranging from chains like Domino’s Pizza and Pizza Hut to smaller mom-and-pop stores. Pizza restaurants’ often rigid schedules, along with rising fuel costs and the risk of crime, have contributed to the shortage, which comes as the pandemic-fueled growth for pizza has tapered off.

Write to Todd Olmstead at [email protected]

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8


After more than two years of pandemic-related upheaval, businesses in many corners of the economy are seeing their Covid disruptions recede.

Supply-chain disruptions have eased. A lack of semiconductors has flipped to a glut, marking a sharp turnaround from a global shortage during two years of supercharged demand. And small businesses and restaurants are finding it easier to hire workers, although pizza-delivery drivers are in short supply after being busy during the pandemic.

With the new year approaching, here is a look at some of The Wall Street Journal’s recent coverage about businesses normalizing following the Covid disruption.

Lengthy backlogs of cargo ships at large ports are gone and ocean shipping rates have fallen below prepandemic levels.



Photo:

David Walter Banks for The Wall Street Journal

Supply-Chain Congestion Eases

Goods are moving around the world again and reaching companies and consumers, despite some production bottlenecks and Covid outbreaks inside China. Weekslong backlogs of cargo ships at large ports from earlier in the pandemic are gone. Ocean shipping rates have fallen below prepandemic levels.

Chips Flip the Script

Chip inventories are swelling, mirroring what is happening in the wider economy where retailers are stuck with goods on their shelves and producers of a range of products in high demand early in the pandemic now face a glut.

The global semiconductor industry has flipped from a shortage to a glut.



Photo:

Heather Ainsworth for The Wall Street Journal

Last-Minute Holiday Shopping Returns

Discounts returned as stores tried to entice cost-conscious customers who were willing to wait for the best deals. The holiday season nail-biter for retailers is a reversal from the past two years, when supply-chain backlogs and shipping delays created an urgency among consumers to shop earlier.

Shoppers are again waiting longer for the best holiday deals as retailers tried to lure them back to stores with discounts.



Photo:

Sinna Nasseri for The Wall Street Journal

Workers Return to Restaurant Jobs

The restaurant industry, which experienced some of the biggest reductions in jobs and workers after the pandemic struck the U.S., has erased most of those losses. Restaurants and bars added 62,000 jobs in November, according to the Labor Department. Restaurant owners and workers attribute the return to a combination of factors including pay increases, improving working conditions and fewer opportunities elsewhere.

Small Businesses Find Hiring Relief

Unfilled job openings continue to weigh on many small businesses. But December marked the first time since July where more small-business owners said in a survey for the Journal that they found it easier—rather than harder—to find workers. Some entrepreneurs say steps such as raising pay, adding apprenticeship programs and rewriting job ads are starting to pay off. Others report an increase in applicants as competitors pull back on hiring or begin layoffs.

Growth is cooling for food-delivery apps such as Uber Eats and DoorDash.



Photo:

Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet for The Wall Street Journal

Food-Delivery Habits Shift

After taking off during the Covid-19 crisis, the biggest food-delivery apps,

DoorDash

and Uber Eats, have continued to record sales expansion. But growth has cooled across the industry. People are switching to in-store pickups, ordering fewer dishes and changing what they get delivered, analysts and industry executives said.

Pizzerias Work to Recruit Delivery Drivers

A shortage of delivery drivers is hurting pizzeria owners ranging from chains like Domino’s Pizza and Pizza Hut to smaller mom-and-pop stores. Pizza restaurants’ often rigid schedules, along with rising fuel costs and the risk of crime, have contributed to the shortage, which comes as the pandemic-fueled growth for pizza has tapered off.

Write to Todd Olmstead at [email protected]

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

FOLLOW US ON GOOGLE NEWS

Read original article here

Denial of responsibility! Techno Blender is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave a comment