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Earth just set a new record for the hottest day ever

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Scientists have recorded the hottest day ever on Earth, and we hit it two days in a row. According to a report from New Scientist, the air two meters above the Earth’s surface hit a global average of 62.92 degrees Fahrenheit (17.18 Celsius), breaking the previous record.

The new record was set on July 4 and breaks the previous record of a global average temperature of 17.01 Celsius, which was just previously set on July 3, making two days in a row the hottest days that Earth has seen since records started. Before this new record, the highest that the global temperature average had hit was 16.92 Celsius (62.46 Fahrenheit).

Seeing two consecutive days breaking the record for the hottest days ever is surely a sign that scientists’ warnings about ongoing climate issues are not to be taken lightly. In fact, some studies even claim that deadly climate doom loops could begin within the next 15 years, which would see our world changing drastically as sea level rises, important forests die, and other catastrophic events take place back to back.

A visualization of how global temperatures have changed over the years. Image source: NASA / YouTube

The temperature was measured and shared by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and was compiled by the University of Maine. The graph they’ve created gives a really good overview of how the global average temperature has risen over the years, eventually reaching the new record-breaking point seto n July 4. If these temperatures continue, climate issues will no doubt become stronger, too.

It is very concerning to see this event taking place, and hopefully, we can see some different ideas coming out and being put into action to try to level the temperatures out, and possibly even reverse climate change a little bit to help keep key ice shelves from melting and raising the global sea level to a catastrophic point.




Scientists have recorded the hottest day ever on Earth, and we hit it two days in a row. According to a report from New Scientist, the air two meters above the Earth’s surface hit a global average of 62.92 degrees Fahrenheit (17.18 Celsius), breaking the previous record.

The new record was set on July 4 and breaks the previous record of a global average temperature of 17.01 Celsius, which was just previously set on July 3, making two days in a row the hottest days that Earth has seen since records started. Before this new record, the highest that the global temperature average had hit was 16.92 Celsius (62.46 Fahrenheit).

Seeing two consecutive days breaking the record for the hottest days ever is surely a sign that scientists’ warnings about ongoing climate issues are not to be taken lightly. In fact, some studies even claim that deadly climate doom loops could begin within the next 15 years, which would see our world changing drastically as sea level rises, important forests die, and other catastrophic events take place back to back.

NASA climate gif visualization
A visualization of how global temperatures have changed over the years. Image source: NASA / YouTube

The temperature was measured and shared by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and was compiled by the University of Maine. The graph they’ve created gives a really good overview of how the global average temperature has risen over the years, eventually reaching the new record-breaking point seto n July 4. If these temperatures continue, climate issues will no doubt become stronger, too.

It is very concerning to see this event taking place, and hopefully, we can see some different ideas coming out and being put into action to try to level the temperatures out, and possibly even reverse climate change a little bit to help keep key ice shelves from melting and raising the global sea level to a catastrophic point.

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