Techno Blender
Digitally Yours.

NASA Gets Closer to Conduct First Flight Test of Its ‘Quiet’ Supersonic Jet

0 61


NASA conducted wind tunnel tests on a scaled-down model of its “quiet” supersonic jet in a bid to one day make supersonic flights flying over communities a reality. Currently, supersonic flights over communities are prohibited as the loud sonic boom could be disruptive. Sonic booms produce a lot of sound energy, around 110 decibels. NASA is trying to validate its boom-reducing technology and boom-predicting capabilities to make supersonic flights quieter and allow future travelers reach their destinations faster. This test, conducted inside an 8ft by 6ft “supersonic wind tunnel” was only the first of the scaled-down model and more detailed tests will take place later this year.

In an Instagram update, the agency shared two images of the scaled-down X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology (QueSST) experimental aircraft.

“Quiet supersonic flight? We’re working on it,” said the agency. The full-scale aircraft, called the “son of Concorde”, is being constructed by NASA and Lockheed Martin. NASA is gearing up for the inaugural test flight of the full-scale X-59 this year.

NASA said the first image showed the aircraft model, measuring about a foot and a half in length, during a sonic boom test inside a wind tunnel at the Glenn Research Centre in Ohio. It was captured by a photographic process called “schlieren”, which shows the flow of air around a scale aircraft model, as well as the shock waves and their positions.

John Wolter, lead researcher on the X-59 sonic boom wind tunnel test, said that with the X-59, they wanted to show that they could turn those unpleasant sonic booms into what he referred to as “sonic thumps”, which are substantially quieter. Wolter added the test demonstrated that they not only had quieter aircraft designs, but also the correct technologies needed to estimate future aircraft noise.

Researchers in aeronautics are attempting to mitigate the effects of a sonic boom by substituting it with a gentle “thump”. In March, the aircraft will travel to Japan for further testing with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Boeing.


For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Redmi Note 11, Redmi Note 11 Pro, Redmi Note 11 Pro 5G Global Variants, Redmi Note 11S Launched: Price, Specifications

Samsung Galaxy A52s 5G Getting One UI 4.0 Update Based on Android 12 in India and Europe: Report




NASA conducted wind tunnel tests on a scaled-down model of its “quiet” supersonic jet in a bid to one day make supersonic flights flying over communities a reality. Currently, supersonic flights over communities are prohibited as the loud sonic boom could be disruptive. Sonic booms produce a lot of sound energy, around 110 decibels. NASA is trying to validate its boom-reducing technology and boom-predicting capabilities to make supersonic flights quieter and allow future travelers reach their destinations faster. This test, conducted inside an 8ft by 6ft “supersonic wind tunnel” was only the first of the scaled-down model and more detailed tests will take place later this year.

In an Instagram update, the agency shared two images of the scaled-down X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology (QueSST) experimental aircraft.

“Quiet supersonic flight? We’re working on it,” said the agency. The full-scale aircraft, called the “son of Concorde”, is being constructed by NASA and Lockheed Martin. NASA is gearing up for the inaugural test flight of the full-scale X-59 this year.

NASA said the first image showed the aircraft model, measuring about a foot and a half in length, during a sonic boom test inside a wind tunnel at the Glenn Research Centre in Ohio. It was captured by a photographic process called “schlieren”, which shows the flow of air around a scale aircraft model, as well as the shock waves and their positions.

John Wolter, lead researcher on the X-59 sonic boom wind tunnel test, said that with the X-59, they wanted to show that they could turn those unpleasant sonic booms into what he referred to as “sonic thumps”, which are substantially quieter. Wolter added the test demonstrated that they not only had quieter aircraft designs, but also the correct technologies needed to estimate future aircraft noise.

Researchers in aeronautics are attempting to mitigate the effects of a sonic boom by substituting it with a gentle “thump”. In March, the aircraft will travel to Japan for further testing with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Boeing.


For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Redmi Note 11, Redmi Note 11 Pro, Redmi Note 11 Pro 5G Global Variants, Redmi Note 11S Launched: Price, Specifications

Samsung Galaxy A52s 5G Getting One UI 4.0 Update Based on Android 12 in India and Europe: Report

FOLLOW US ON GOOGLE NEWS

Read original article here

Denial of responsibility! Techno Blender is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave a comment