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Samsung educates French customers on recycling old phones and tablets

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Last updated: October 7th, 2022 at 16:32 UTC+02:00

Samsung has launched an initiative to raise the French public’s awareness of digital technologies recycling. The company has installed collection points in the city of Saint-Quen, where residents can drop off their used devices, including phones, tablets, and mobile accessories. Samsung will pick up these devices and accessories to be entrusted to the ECOSYSTEM organization.

ECOSYSTEM will recover as many materials as possible from these devices and accessories. The drop-off locations in Saint-Quen will be accessible to citizens until October 28, 2022.

The people of Saint-Quen are also invited to a conference hosting the Chairman and CEO of Samsung Electronics France and other executives. They will be discussing the importance of recycling and repairing mobile devices in the context of our climate. The conference will be held on October 12 at Serre Wangari in Saint-Quen.

According to Samsung France, more than 100 million unused phones are now tucked away in drawers, and although 78% of their components could be recycled, customers aren’t very willing to go through with the process. Only about 5% of smartphone users choose to recycle old devices, hence the initiative to raise awareness on reusability and recovery of materials.

Speaking of older unrecycled smartphones kept in drawers, if you decide to keep your old Galaxy smartphone around, make sure you read Samsung’s guidelines on how to maintain the battery of these devices to prevent them from triggering chemical reactions that expand the batteries. There’s been a lot of noise lately about old Samsung phones suffering from these battery issues, even though, for the most part, they could be avoided with a bit of maintenance.


Last updated: October 7th, 2022 at 16:32 UTC+02:00

Samsung has launched an initiative to raise the French public’s awareness of digital technologies recycling. The company has installed collection points in the city of Saint-Quen, where residents can drop off their used devices, including phones, tablets, and mobile accessories. Samsung will pick up these devices and accessories to be entrusted to the ECOSYSTEM organization.

ECOSYSTEM will recover as many materials as possible from these devices and accessories. The drop-off locations in Saint-Quen will be accessible to citizens until October 28, 2022.

The people of Saint-Quen are also invited to a conference hosting the Chairman and CEO of Samsung Electronics France and other executives. They will be discussing the importance of recycling and repairing mobile devices in the context of our climate. The conference will be held on October 12 at Serre Wangari in Saint-Quen.

According to Samsung France, more than 100 million unused phones are now tucked away in drawers, and although 78% of their components could be recycled, customers aren’t very willing to go through with the process. Only about 5% of smartphone users choose to recycle old devices, hence the initiative to raise awareness on reusability and recovery of materials.

Speaking of older unrecycled smartphones kept in drawers, if you decide to keep your old Galaxy smartphone around, make sure you read Samsung’s guidelines on how to maintain the battery of these devices to prevent them from triggering chemical reactions that expand the batteries. There’s been a lot of noise lately about old Samsung phones suffering from these battery issues, even though, for the most part, they could be avoided with a bit of maintenance.

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