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The influence of social media on revenge tourism

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Research in the International Journal of Tourism Policy has shown how social media platforms can influence holidaymakers and travelers in seeking out destinations that have been the victims of adverse events, natural disasters or conflicts. The colloquial term “revenge tourism” was coined in 2021 for this kind of vacation where people sought out experiences to combat the negative impact of lockdowns and lost time caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the term has taken on a broader definition since.

Vishal Shukla of the School of Business at Auro University in Surat and Pramod Kumar Srivastava of the School of Business at Galgotias University in Greater Noida, India, examined user-generated content on social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. They could glean insights into the role social media played in both the origin and spread of this kind of tourism. The prevalence of posts in this context reflects the growing significance of social media as a space for individuals to share their travel narratives and recommendations, the research shows.

The team explains that the findings have implications for tourism management, disaster management, and social media administration. From a theoretical standpoint, the study also adds to our existing knowledge of the influence of social media activity on tourism. It suggests that there is a need for additional studies to examine the repercussions of this kind of tourism on local communities at the travel destinations in question.

There is also a pressing need to emphasize the responsibilities of various tourism stakeholders. Advocating for the adoption of responsible tourism practices that consider the potential consequences of tourism on local communities should be high on the agenda. In addition, there is a need to develop sustainable tourism so that “revenge tourism,” however well-meaning, does not have a detrimental effect on the very locations and communities it seeks to help.

Indeed, from a societal perspective, the research encourages destination marketers and travel companies to balance the benefits against putative adverse effects. It also promotes a shift toward sustainable practices that could foster mutual benefits for both tourists and the locations they visit.

More information:
Vishal Shukla et al, Travelling with a vengeance: the influence of social media on revenge tourism, International Journal of Tourism Policy (2023). DOI: 10.1504/IJTP.2023.134525

Citation:
The influence of social media on revenge tourism (2023, November 14)
retrieved 14 November 2023
from https://phys.org/news/2023-11-social-media-revenge-tourism.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.




tourist
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Research in the International Journal of Tourism Policy has shown how social media platforms can influence holidaymakers and travelers in seeking out destinations that have been the victims of adverse events, natural disasters or conflicts. The colloquial term “revenge tourism” was coined in 2021 for this kind of vacation where people sought out experiences to combat the negative impact of lockdowns and lost time caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the term has taken on a broader definition since.

Vishal Shukla of the School of Business at Auro University in Surat and Pramod Kumar Srivastava of the School of Business at Galgotias University in Greater Noida, India, examined user-generated content on social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. They could glean insights into the role social media played in both the origin and spread of this kind of tourism. The prevalence of posts in this context reflects the growing significance of social media as a space for individuals to share their travel narratives and recommendations, the research shows.

The team explains that the findings have implications for tourism management, disaster management, and social media administration. From a theoretical standpoint, the study also adds to our existing knowledge of the influence of social media activity on tourism. It suggests that there is a need for additional studies to examine the repercussions of this kind of tourism on local communities at the travel destinations in question.

There is also a pressing need to emphasize the responsibilities of various tourism stakeholders. Advocating for the adoption of responsible tourism practices that consider the potential consequences of tourism on local communities should be high on the agenda. In addition, there is a need to develop sustainable tourism so that “revenge tourism,” however well-meaning, does not have a detrimental effect on the very locations and communities it seeks to help.

Indeed, from a societal perspective, the research encourages destination marketers and travel companies to balance the benefits against putative adverse effects. It also promotes a shift toward sustainable practices that could foster mutual benefits for both tourists and the locations they visit.

More information:
Vishal Shukla et al, Travelling with a vengeance: the influence of social media on revenge tourism, International Journal of Tourism Policy (2023). DOI: 10.1504/IJTP.2023.134525

Citation:
The influence of social media on revenge tourism (2023, November 14)
retrieved 14 November 2023
from https://phys.org/news/2023-11-social-media-revenge-tourism.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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