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Mercedes to roll out autonomous driving technology in Nevada, Auto News, ET Auto

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Mercedes-Benz originally revealed at CES 2023 that Nevada had accepted its application; as of Thursday, the last certification stages had been finished.

New Delhi: Mercedes-Benz has been granted formal authority by the state of Nevada to market cars equipped with the most cutting-edge autonomous technology currently accessible to the US buyers. The first client deliveries will start in the second half of 2023, and Mercedes S-Class and EQS Sedans will be equipped with Level 3 autonomous driving capabilities for the 2024 model year.

Mercedes-Benz originally revealed at CES 2023 that Nevada had accepted its application; as of Thursday, the last certification stages had been finished.

Mercedes-Benz achieved this certification last year and has been selling cars with the software in Germany since May 2022, making it the first carmaker in Europe to do so.

“Certification in Nevada marks the start of [an] international rollout and, with it, the dawning of a new era. This significant milestone sets the ground-breaking Mercedes-Benz Drive Pilot system apart as the first and only Level 3 system in a standard-production vehicle authorized for use on US public freeways,” Markus Schäfer, chief technology officer at Mercedes-Benz, said.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) defines Level 3 as a spectrum of automation from 0 to 6. The highest level, six, does not require a steering wheel. Mercedes’ Level 3 cars are categorized as “conditional automation,” where the vehicle can sense its surroundings and carry out the majority of activities but still needs a human driver.

As Mercedes explains, “The driver must be ready to take control of the vehicle at all times when prompted to intervene by the vehicle.”

Level 2 autonomous driving is what Tesla’s Autopilot is categorized as, making it less sophisticated. The SAE defines Level 2 as “partial automation,” where the vehicle is mostly capable of accelerating and steering. The driver is supposed to observe and take appropriate action, as well as carry out other tasks including merging.

The Mercedes Drive Pilot software uses data from outside cameras, microphones, and LiDAR to learn about its surroundings (such as the amount of road moisture present) and take appropriate action.

By pushing a button on the steering wheel’s rim, Mercedes drivers turn on the software. The device will alert the driver when the conditions are right to switch on Drive Pilot, which is often when there is heavy traffic on the motorway.

One restriction applies: It only functions up to 40 mph. It’s unclear how frequently drivers may utilize the feature because roads have speed limits over 40 mph, but it’s evident that waiting in traffic is one situation where automation would certainly be helpful.

“When the driver activates Drive Pilot, the system controls the speed and distance, and effortlessly guides the vehicle within its lane,” Mercedes says. “Events occurring on the route and traffic signs are correspondingly taken into consideration. The system also reacts to unexpected traffic situations and handles them independently, [for example] by evasive manoeuvres within the lane or by braking manoeuvres.”

The programme, according to Mercedes, is “much more powerful than conventional GPS systems.” The hardware on the vehicle (cameras, LiDAR sensors, etc.) interacts with the software, which is housed on a chip in the central control unit of the vehicle, to continually process photos and produce a high-resolution 3D model of the road.

“Each vehicle also stores an image of this map information on board, constantly compares it with the backend data and updates the local dataset as required,” Mercedes says. “All of this enables stable and accurate positioning through a representation of the surroundings that is independent of factors such as shadows or dirty sensors.”

The vehicles still remain “manoeuvrable even if one of these systems fails and a safe handover to the driver can be ensured.”

The automobile will halt “in a controlled manner” and put on its hazard lights if a driver is unresponsive and fails to regain control despite “increasingly urgent prodding.” First responders will be able to enter the vehicle because the Mercedes-Benz emergency call system will be activated and the doors will unlock.

Autonomous system performance on public roads has been uneven. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recorded 18 fatal collisions using Level 2 automated vehicles between June 2021 and November 2022, 16 of which involved Tesla’s. Last summer, a deadly collision also involved a Level 2 autonomous BMW in Germany.

If a self-driving car is involved in an accident, there are also responsibility and legal considerations to consider. Schäfer said at a roundtable discussion at CES that the firm, not the driver, will be held accountable if the car is to blame for the collision.

The technology will then probably be approved for Mercedes-Benz in the state of California. The business has already submitted its application and anticipates getting the go-ahead later in the year.

Also Read:

Auto major Tata Motors has recently announced that it aims to achieve carbon neutrality for the commercial vehicle (CV) segment by 2045 and its goal for passenger vehicles (PVs) remains 2040. The company is working on a twin strategy: diverse technology-mix in its product portfolio, and focus on renewable energy for its supply chain operations. It has also created a collaborative platform called ‘Aikyam’ with all its vendors.




 Mercedes-Benz originally revealed at CES 2023 that Nevada had accepted its application; as of Thursday, the last certification stages had been finished.
Mercedes-Benz originally revealed at CES 2023 that Nevada had accepted its application; as of Thursday, the last certification stages had been finished.

New Delhi: Mercedes-Benz has been granted formal authority by the state of Nevada to market cars equipped with the most cutting-edge autonomous technology currently accessible to the US buyers. The first client deliveries will start in the second half of 2023, and Mercedes S-Class and EQS Sedans will be equipped with Level 3 autonomous driving capabilities for the 2024 model year.

Mercedes-Benz originally revealed at CES 2023 that Nevada had accepted its application; as of Thursday, the last certification stages had been finished.

Mercedes-Benz achieved this certification last year and has been selling cars with the software in Germany since May 2022, making it the first carmaker in Europe to do so.

“Certification in Nevada marks the start of [an] international rollout and, with it, the dawning of a new era. This significant milestone sets the ground-breaking Mercedes-Benz Drive Pilot system apart as the first and only Level 3 system in a standard-production vehicle authorized for use on US public freeways,” Markus Schäfer, chief technology officer at Mercedes-Benz, said.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) defines Level 3 as a spectrum of automation from 0 to 6. The highest level, six, does not require a steering wheel. Mercedes’ Level 3 cars are categorized as “conditional automation,” where the vehicle can sense its surroundings and carry out the majority of activities but still needs a human driver.

As Mercedes explains, “The driver must be ready to take control of the vehicle at all times when prompted to intervene by the vehicle.”

Level 2 autonomous driving is what Tesla’s Autopilot is categorized as, making it less sophisticated. The SAE defines Level 2 as “partial automation,” where the vehicle is mostly capable of accelerating and steering. The driver is supposed to observe and take appropriate action, as well as carry out other tasks including merging.

The Mercedes Drive Pilot software uses data from outside cameras, microphones, and LiDAR to learn about its surroundings (such as the amount of road moisture present) and take appropriate action.

By pushing a button on the steering wheel’s rim, Mercedes drivers turn on the software. The device will alert the driver when the conditions are right to switch on Drive Pilot, which is often when there is heavy traffic on the motorway.

One restriction applies: It only functions up to 40 mph. It’s unclear how frequently drivers may utilize the feature because roads have speed limits over 40 mph, but it’s evident that waiting in traffic is one situation where automation would certainly be helpful.

“When the driver activates Drive Pilot, the system controls the speed and distance, and effortlessly guides the vehicle within its lane,” Mercedes says. “Events occurring on the route and traffic signs are correspondingly taken into consideration. The system also reacts to unexpected traffic situations and handles them independently, [for example] by evasive manoeuvres within the lane or by braking manoeuvres.”

The programme, according to Mercedes, is “much more powerful than conventional GPS systems.” The hardware on the vehicle (cameras, LiDAR sensors, etc.) interacts with the software, which is housed on a chip in the central control unit of the vehicle, to continually process photos and produce a high-resolution 3D model of the road.

“Each vehicle also stores an image of this map information on board, constantly compares it with the backend data and updates the local dataset as required,” Mercedes says. “All of this enables stable and accurate positioning through a representation of the surroundings that is independent of factors such as shadows or dirty sensors.”

The vehicles still remain “manoeuvrable even if one of these systems fails and a safe handover to the driver can be ensured.”

The automobile will halt “in a controlled manner” and put on its hazard lights if a driver is unresponsive and fails to regain control despite “increasingly urgent prodding.” First responders will be able to enter the vehicle because the Mercedes-Benz emergency call system will be activated and the doors will unlock.

Autonomous system performance on public roads has been uneven. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recorded 18 fatal collisions using Level 2 automated vehicles between June 2021 and November 2022, 16 of which involved Tesla’s. Last summer, a deadly collision also involved a Level 2 autonomous BMW in Germany.

If a self-driving car is involved in an accident, there are also responsibility and legal considerations to consider. Schäfer said at a roundtable discussion at CES that the firm, not the driver, will be held accountable if the car is to blame for the collision.

The technology will then probably be approved for Mercedes-Benz in the state of California. The business has already submitted its application and anticipates getting the go-ahead later in the year.

Also Read:

Auto major Tata Motors has recently announced that it aims to achieve carbon neutrality for the commercial vehicle (CV) segment by 2045 and its goal for passenger vehicles (PVs) remains 2040. The company is working on a twin strategy: diverse technology-mix in its product portfolio, and focus on renewable energy for its supply chain operations. It has also created a collaborative platform called ‘Aikyam’ with all its vendors.

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